Unlikely Stories
Day 1, 7-21-18

Day 1, 7-21-18

July 21, 2018

Day 1, The Beginning

Portland, OR

Welcome to my first podcast! On this day I walked and bus rode the streets of Portland, seeing who I might record. While I had many minutes of meetings and conversations, I only recorded 18 minutes of content, which I strung together raw and unedited for this podcast. These included two talented and interesting musicians from very different walks of life.

The picture accompanying this podcast was taken by a former co-worker I ran into on the streets this day not once, but twice. She took this picture to send to one of the people who still works at our old work place. We have not seen each other in several years, and it was a fun double-encounter. She did not wish to be recorded. 

This is Day 1 of what is planned to be a 24-day Oregon journey.

Voices: 

Matt  Burns, Narrator   

Allison Parker, 15 Year-Old Violinist and Global Adventurer, Portland, OR

Jedediah, Musician and Songwriter, Streets of Portand, OR

Day 2, 7-22-18

Day 2, 7-22-18

July 31, 2018

Day 2, Not In Portland Anymore

Portland, OR --> Goldendale, WA --> Madras, OR

Greetings from Day 11! Welcome to Day 2 of the podcast! I have been mostly off-the-grid since I departed Portland on Sunday, July 21. The recordings from that day, four special people making the world a better place from Ekone Horse Ranch in Goldendale, WA, as well as my post-script from Madras, OR, comprise the content of episode 2.

As I write this it is late afternoon on Tuesday, July 31. I have been this afternoon at a friend's with internet in Ashland, OR, and am about to depart from here to go camping for two nights in southwestern Oregon. I am not decided yet where, but definitely out of the smoke that has been clogging this neck of the woods for many days now.

From here in Day 11, I can say that I have recorded many inspiring and interesting people in some remarkably beautiful settings. It will probably be some days before I get Day 3 posted, but for now, here are 36 minutes of people doing good in the world, all of my footage from Day 2, raw and unedited, as will be the norm for this 3.5-week podcasting adventure. I will give it all, you listen to what you want. Thank you for visiting!

Voices:

Matt  Burns, Narrator   

Chris Woodcock, Cook at Ekone Horse Ranch, Goldendale, WA

Enrique, Visiting Worker at Ekone Horse Ranch, from Ibiza, Spain

Shonie Schlotzhauer, Executive Director of Ekone, Goldendale, WA

Liz Coppola, Operations Director at Ekone, Goldendale, WA

Day 3, 7-23-18

Day 3, 7-23-18

August 3, 2018

Day 3, 7-23-18, Surprise Fishing Trip, Lower Deschutes River

Madras, OR —> Lower Deschutes River —> Breitenbush Hot Springs

We left at 3:15 AM and arrived at the Lower Deschutes River at 5 AM. I was with Grant Putnam, who had invited me on this trip at 9 PM the night before. He is a long-time river guide, one of a small number of people authorized to take jet boat tours up the Lower Deschutes River, and he had a couple of spots open up at the last minute. 

This was a day of many firsts for me: first time jet boating up river rapids, first time fishing in a river, first time wearing waders, first time catching a bass (we were fishing for steelhead), first time seeing the Lower Deschutes River. It was only the second day this part of the river was reopened, after the “Substation” wildfire that started four days earlier had burned through. The landscape was predominantly brown, black, scorched and ashy, except for some small trees that managed to stay standing near the river banks. Despite this, it was still astonishingly beautiful, and was for me a day of nourishment I will never forget.

It was also a day of some technical difficulties, which continued for the next couple of days (I’m writing this from the future), until I figured out the glitch. Due to this, my interview with Grant on the ride back to his ranch after the trip was lost in progress after about 30 minutes. Like when one accidentally deletes a written work, we went back and started again. It wasn’t quite the same when we were re-having the conversations we had just had, and the glitches continued to cut us off every so often, so the interview is a bit disjunctive. But in the spirit of this project, I am posting it in full (background noise from his rig and all), to be heard or not heard. I also recorded a man who I met on the fishing trip, Roger, while standing in the Lower Deschutes. 

Since I have not yet mentioned in the written posts, I want to note that in both of these interviews, and some of the ones to follow in days to come, I am tracking the theme of people talking about the work that they do and how they feel about it, so as to build a collected body on this topic and eventually recapitulate the published work of Studs Terkel (1912-2008), my “mentor from beyond the grave”, called “Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do”. The encounter with this book was profound for me, as I saw in Studs someone who had already done with recording people’s stories what I wanted to do. So as a kind of homage to him, and also as a research into human nature, and also as a focus for my passion of story collecting, I would like to publish “Working, Revisited” in 2024, the 50-year anniversary of the original work, so a glimpse can be given of how things are the same and how they are different in the way humans talk about their work and themselves 50 years later. 

That said, this theme of “Working” is only given to people as a suggestion, and as a way to succinctly frame this podcasting project. If someone ever has something different living for them that they wish to share, I always follow their lead. In the days that follow, there will be examples of this. 

In the case of this day on the Lower Deschutes, the two interviews were tracking with this theme of “work”. After my opening narratives, Roger’s interview is from about the 5-minute mark to the 26-minute. My disjunctive “re-interview” with Grant is the remaining 39 minutes. The whole thing is 65 minutes. The photo is from the jet boat, and is the only one I took that day.

 

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Roger, Designer and Builder of Operating Rooms and Surgical Centers

Grant Putnam, Jet Boat Fishing Guide, Grass-Fed Cattle Rancher, Auctioneer

Day 4, 7-24-18

Day 4, 7-24-18

August 4, 2018

Day 4, 7-24-2018, Up South Breitenbush River

Breitenbush Hot Springs and Retreat Center, Detroit, OR

The nature therapy continued for me on Day 4, as I hiked from Breitenbush Hot Springs and Retreat Center, up the South Breitenbush River, through old growth and along stony river banks, up the Gorge Trail, to the north bank of Roaring Creek. There I met a man named John Casey, who had just crossed the Roaring Creek on a wobbly foot path of stones and logs. As the Roaring Creek was my turn-back point, we headed back in the same direction. 

On the way back, John pointed out to me the burned timberline on the other side of the gorge. Last year’s wildfires had reached to there, about a mile from Breitenbush, which had evacuated at the time. John also offered to share his story for this little podcasting journey. Once again the guiding theme was “Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.” John went from graduate school at Stanford Universtiy, to many years in the high-intensity corporate world, to leaving it all behind and spiritually seeking. A few days after we met, he was to start elder care-taking at a center in Oregon founded by his Ananda Church, which is based on the teachings of Paramhansa Yogananda. 

This podcast episode starts with 13 minutes of my narrative and ambient sounds from Breitenbush, and ends with 44 minutes of interview with John Casey. Thank you for visiting!

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

John Casey, Former Corporate Bigwig, Current Spiritual Seeker

Day 5, 7-25-18

Day 5, 7-25-18

August 4, 2018

Day 5, 7-25-2018, People of Breitenbush

Breitenbush Hot Springs and Retreat Center, Detroit, OR

Thanks to this little podcasting project, I was invited by Leona, a resident and worker at Breitenbush, to extend my stay for an additional day, and to camp outside her pod-home in the Breitenbush Community Village, so that I could interview David, one of the elders at Breitenbush, the following morning. On this leisurely and again rejuvenating day, I went swimming on the land at Devil’s Hole, a decidedly cold swim with a nice rock to jump from, and a small waterfall that you can fit just a head underneath and breathe from the other side…for as long as you can tolerate the cold of waterfall on your shoulders. From sunset into full darkness, I soaked in a trio of delightful hot springs called the meadow pools.

I also interviewed several people on this unexpected bonus day. Sadly, I somehow lost my interview on the bench-swing with Leona. In addition, other technical troubles related to a full memory card on my recorder continued. Nonetheless, excepting the missing interview, I think it all turned out fine in the end. Though I have up until now been posting all footage, I have decided here to exclude several clips of a guided tour of Breitenbush led by a woman named Susa, because of either poor sound quality or lack of visuals needed for context. I posted six minutes of this tour. 

In addition to the clip from the tour (minutes 36-42), this podcast episode includes 3 minutes of opening narrative, and three interviews of people on the theme of working. The first is Azlan Smith (minutes 3-21), a 28-year-old writer and school teacher who was at Breitenbush as a teacher in the week-long retreat taking place. The second is Mona Nicholson (minutes 21-36), a retired principal and school teacher, and the current Events Coordinator at Breitenbush. The third is a 39-year ganja farmer (minutes 42-91), who was visiting Breitenbush with his wife and two children. 

This episode is 91 minutes long. I have no picture from this day, so I posted one of me with Jude the Dog from two years ago. 

 

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Azlan Smith, School Teacher and Writer

Mona Nicholson, Retired School Teacher and Principal, Events Coordinator at Breitenbush

Susa, Resident and Worker at Breitenbush

“The Father”, Ganja Farmer

Day 6, 7-26-18

Day 6, 7-26-18

August 4, 2018

Day 6, 7-26-2018, Leaving Breitenbush

Breitenbush Hot Springs —> Eugene, OR

On Day 6, my final day at Breitenbush, where I left around 3 PM, I woke up at 6 AM to interview David, one of the elders at Breitenbush, outside whose pod-home I had camped the night before. Writing this from Day 15, I can say that so far Day 6 was the last day of serious technical difficulties (translated as “recordings lost”), but they occurred in both Day 6 interviews. 

I lost everything but the last 8 minutes of David’s interview, which opens with him talking about the “hippy anarchists” (which included him) who were the founders of the current Breitenbush Community in 1977. It was in the beginning that he said his full name (which I forget), and then he shared probably 15 minutes that I lost due to some reason I don’t understand. 

Then, in my second and final interview of that day, my memory card filled right toward what would have been the close of an otherwise successfully recorded session, and this abrupt end is the close of the Day 6 recordings. 

The problems have since been resolved, and I think the interestingness of these interviewees comes through despite the technical difficulties. 

This podcast is 25 minutes long. The first four minutes are my narrative, then 8 minutes of David, and 13 minutes of Kristina, a person on 7-week medical leave (and on day 3 of 9 at Breitenbush) due to ongoing migraines for 1.5 years, which she attributes to the stress of her work as program manager work (which she loves) with LGBTQ teenagers in the Bay Area.

After my interview with Kristina, I left Breitenbush, made a three-hour drive southwest to Eugene, and spent the night in a bed at the home of some friends.

I again don’t have any pictures from this day, so I posted some blackboard drawings I did while teaching 6th grade geometry last school year.

 

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

David, Breitenbush Community worker and elder

Kristina, Program Manager at LGBTQ youth center in Bay Area

Day 7, 7-27-18

Day 7, 7-27-18

August 4, 2018

Day 7, 7-27-18, Plants Enchant Gathering

Eugene, OR —> Salem, OR (-ish)

Today is a short podcast, about 15 minutes. I caught myself by surprise and spontaneously headed to a weekend at the “Plants Enchant Gathering” outside Salem, OR, instead of going south to Medford, where I was to interview 93-year-old Teedy Woodcock (mother of Chris Woodcock, Ekone Ranch cook from Day 2), who was a World War II prisoner of war in the Philippines from 1942-1945. I postponed that interview until the following week so I could head to the gathering, which ended up being an amazing weekend. 

The interview from my first evening at Plants Enchant is with Tristan “Axi” Codrescu, someone I got to know just a little bit while working on staff at the National College of Natural Medicine while he was a Chinese medicine student. The first time I met him, in Fall 2007, when I introduced myself he pointed to a button he was wearing that read “I’m Having a Day of Silence.” He is a prayerful man, a skilled healer, and a good-hearted person, and it was a pleasure to run into him and get to listen to a little bit of his story at this lovely gathering. 

I again have no picture from this day, so I'm posting a picture of my juggling shadow.

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Tristan “Axi” Codrescu, Acupuncturist, Healer, Performer, Clown

Day 8, 7-28-18

Day 8, 7-28-18

August 4, 2018

Day 8, 7-28-18, Plants Enchant Gathering, Day 2

Outside of Salem, OR

In today’s episode, still from the delightful Plants Enchant Gathering, I had a spontaneous interview on a steep hill in the woods with a woman named Chelsey, who happened to be the second burnt-out counselor I had interviewed in less than 48 hours. I also had a sit-down with Morgan Brent, the founder of the Plants Enchant and the larger Singing Alive Gathering, of which Plants Enchant is an off-shoot. Then I recorded a brief tale told by John Thomas “JT” Hearst. At the end there are a couple of songs that I’m sorry to say I cannot name or attribute. The first I recorded was by people in the dark, and it sounds like it might be called “Wolf Song”. The second I think is called “When I Rise”, and I recorded it in a tent where someone was leading it. 

The whole episode is 38 minutes, of which Chelsey is 8 minutes, Morgan is 22 minutes, John Thomas is 2 minutes, and the songs are 6. 

I again have no picture from this day, and I've run out of other pictures to share, so I'm just letting the opening photo stand until I have something else.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Chelsey, Recently Worked with At-Risk Youth; Moving to Boulder, CO

Morgan Brent, Founder of Plants Enchant and Singing Alive Gatherings

John Thomas “JT” Hearst, Storyteller

Songs, “Wolf Song” and “When I Rise"

Day 9, 7-29-18

Day 9, 7-29-18

August 5, 2018

Day 9, 7-29-18, Plants Enchant Gathering, Day 3

Outside of Salem, OR

If the Plants Enchant Gathering lasted a whole week, I would be happy to stay, but this was the last day—and it was a full and interesting day! In the morning, I had the chance to catch up with Plants Enchant workshop presenters Scott and Kathryn Kloos, husband and wife herbalists, plant medicine healers, and good kind people. Kathryn is also a naturopathic physician, who I first met in Fall 2007, when I began working on staff at the National College of Natural Medicine and she was a third-year medical student. While I conducted their interviews (each about 26 minutes) individually, we all three were sitting together as they took place. Their stories are wide ranging and interesting, and I recommend them.

Shortly after the interview with Scott and Kathryn, I ran into Kathryn again, and while we were talking someone walked up and asked her if she would share a song called “Spirit of Healing”. This was especially interesting because when Kathryn (who is a song carrier  of hundreds of sacred songs) had started our interview, she decided to begin with a song. She had thought of singing “Spirit of Healing”, but was forgetting one verse, so she sang instead a song of hers called “Water of Life” (which I had heard sung at several small gatherings and not known was hers). Then as we were walking away from the interview she had remembered the verse, only to have this person ask her to sing it a few minutes later, which I then recorded. It is a song that came to her friend Desiree, and is for people who serve the underserved.

A little after this, I had the good fortune to encounter what will always be one of my most memorable interviews. Those who know me best know that I have a soft spot for puppets, and in this case I got to interview Plants Enchant workshop presenter, Camilla Blossom Bishop, and her unicorn hand puppet, Uni. This was my first opportunity to interview either a puppet or a unicorn, and I so hope it is not the last. What a gift! 

This episode closes with a song called “Eel River Chant”, that I sang along with four others in the grass in the Sunday evening darkness. I had learned the song elsewhere, but heard that it was first shared at one of the Singing Alive gatherings, and here I met four people who knew it. My understanding is that this song came to a woman named Meredith Buck, who was participating in some experience where she was to find and cross the Eel River blindfolded by listening to the sound of a drumming on the other Side, and that when she stepped in the river this three-part song came to her. It’s tricky to get the hang of, but I think we got it close enough.

This podcast is 69 minutes long. 52 minutes is Scott and Katherine Kloos, then 3 minutes of song with Katherine, then 13 minutes with Camilla Blossom Bishop and Uni the Unicorn hand puppet, then 1 minute of Eel River Chant. Thanks for visiting!

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Scott Kloos, Herbalist, Wildcrafter, Medicine Maker, Founder of School of Forest Medicine, Owner of Cascade Folk Medicine, Author of guidebook Pacific Northwest Medicinal Plants.

Kathryn Kloos, Naturopathic Physician (specializing in women’s health), Massage Therapist, Ceremonialist, Astrologer, Song Carrier

Camilla Blossom Bishop, Soul Midwife, Nature Spirit, Flower Essence Alchemist 

Uni Tick, Unicorn Hand Puppet, Spirit Guide to Camilla Blossom Bishop

Songs, “Water of Life”, “Spirit of Healing”, “Eel River Chant”

Day 10, 7-30-18

Day 10, 7-30-18

August 5, 2018

Day 10, 7-30-18, Smoky Ashland

Outside of Salem, OR —> Wellsprings Community —> Ashland, OR

Writing from Day 16, I can say that today’s interviews, particularly the second, were some of the most personally moving for me. I left the Plants Enchant Gathering land around 9 AM, along with a new friend named Melissa who needed a ride to Ashland, which is where I was headed so as to interview 94-year-old Teedy Woodcock in Medford, which is just north of Ashland. As we got within an hour of Ashland, we were enveloped in a haze of smoke from wildfires, smoke which had been depressingly blanketing that area, continually shrouding the sun and congesting people’s breathing, for about a month, and showed no signs of dissipating. I drove Melissa to the hot springs community where she lives, called Wellsprings Community, on the north end of Ashland. There I was invited to soak in the hot spring pool and cool swimming pool for “Staff Swim”, which happens every Monday afternoon after the pools have been closed for cleaning. 

After a rejuvenating soak in the lithia-rich mineral spring waters, I parted company with Melissa. I then found a man in the community named Marco Antonio Berrios, who offered to share with me his remarkable story of having been in a coma at 22 years old for 9 days before flatlining (dying) for five minutes, whereupon he had an interaction with the spiritual world, the messages from which continue to resound in his being these 20 years later. It was quite a fascinating story.

Later that night, in Ashland, I had an encounter with a 58 year-old man, Robert Burnside, a prisoner for his adult life until 14 years ago, houseless and addicted to methamphetamines, and a good-hearted person. It was a powerful and painful experience for me to hear his story, and the mental and physical suffering he has and continues to undergo. This was a man who experienced himself as having no one. As we parted ways, I gave him my phone number and said that now he could always have someone to call. He had no contact info but gave me the number of his brother, who lives in Las Vegas, and asked that if he didn’t call me in one month that I please call his brother and tell him. Due to the pain from his need for double hip replacement, he could walk no further for shelter that night, and as I left with my body that doesn't hurt to stay in a bed in my friends’ home, he was going to find a place on the hard earth. I had already been reflecting on my privilege that I can be on this little podcasting journey, and this encounter brought this home to me in an especially profound way. I recommend Robert's story.

This episode is 74 minutes. My opening narrative is 5 minutes, the interview with Marco is 20 minutes, and the interview with Robert is 49 minutes. 

The picture, where I had been hoping to demonstrate the smoke-covered sun in Ashland, was taken on my Iphone 5 by a man who used to be a photographer for the New York Times and Washington Post. I met him and his teenage son on the street and had a very nice conversation (not recorded) with them. Thanks for visiting!

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Marco Antonio Berrios, Author, Videographer, Flatline Survivor

Robert Burnside, Ex-Convict, Meth-Addict, Houseless, Good-hearted Person

 

 

Day 11, 7-31-18

Day 11, 7-31-18

August 5, 2018

Day 11, 7-31-18, Prisoner of War

Ashland, OR —> Medford, OR —> Chetko River, Oregon Coast

What an honor and a privilege it was to interview Teedy Woodcock. Teedy is a 93-year-old American woman, who at 17 years-old was living with her mother and father in the Philippines in 1941, when the United States entered World War II after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor. Teedy’s father worked for the US military. On Christmas Eve morning, 1941, the Japanese strategically bombed the Manila building where he was working, and Teedy’s father was killed. One week later, on New Year’s Day, Teedy and her mother were taken into detention by the Japanese, and they would remain prisoners of war until they were liberated in 1945. Teedy’s fascinating story is at the same time a history lesson.

This episode is 48 minutes long, my opening narratives for 7 minutes, and then 41 minutes with Teedy. It was a huge gift for me to meet this unique elder, and I think you will find her story interesting and educational. 

The picture is a selfie from Cape Blanco, which I actually didn't get to until Day 12, but I already have another picture for that day and didn't have one from Day 11.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrative

Teedy Woodcock, Elder, American Prisoner of War in Philippines 1942-45

Day 12, 8-01-18

Day 12, 8-01-18

August 5, 2018

Day 12, 8-01-18, Elk River Swimming, War Stories

Chetko River —> Elk River —> Cape Blanco, Oregon Coast

Today was another first: I interviewed someone who has killed many people, and has been a party to killing many more. He was also a hospitable and generous host who provided me a place for my tent in an otherwise full campground at Cape Blanco. On my drive up the coast, a retired river guide I met recommended a couple of places to me, one of which was the Elk River, and one of which was Cape Blanco. I went to both, and since it was about 3:30 when I arrived at Cape Blanco, and the campground sign read “Vacancy,” I decided I would camp there for the night. Well, it turned out the campground was full, as you will hear if you listen to this episode.

This episode is part fun and part intense. The first 15 minutes I take you on my journey up the southern Oregon coast, which includes swimming (and also falling) in the Elk River, and a spontaneous riverside ukulele song for my dear friend Georgia, who crossed the threshold last November. Then I end up at Cape Blanco, where I meet a Vietnam helicopter pilot combat veteran, who—long story short (and described in the audio)—invites me to pitch my tent at the campsite where his RV is parked. He then shares his story, sometimes intense and perhaps “listener discretion advised”, but also fascinating and educational. The next morning, which will be Day 13 of the podcast, he goes on to share about some of the more secretive overseas missions with which he was involved while working as a private citizen from 1972-1995.

Though I am still carrying the spirit of unedited raw footage, and am posting all my footage from Day 12, I will be cutting out one half-second of something I had said before interviewing Cat on record based on what he had shared with me prior to that. It had to do with the label of a unit he was working within for his covert missions, and as he opted not to name it in our recording, I also am opting to cut it from the record. Otherwise, everything is there in full. If you’re the type of person who has interest in the perspectives and experiences of a combat helicopter pilot in the Vietnam War, I think you will be captivated by this interview, as well as the next hour from Day 13. If you like to hear footage of someone in the Elk River and tromping around coastal Oregon, then you’ll like the beginning. Thanks for visiting!

This podcast is 122 minutes long. The first 20 minutes are my journeying up the Elk River and the narrative run-up to my interview with Cat Williams, Vietnam combat veteran, in Cape Blanco campground. The remaining 102 minutes are the interview with Cat. Part 2 of my interview with Cat took place the next morning in his RV, Day 13. The picture is one I took of Cat in front of his rig. Thanks for visiting!

 

 

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Cat Williams, Vietnam Combat Veteran, Warrant Officer Aviator, Helicopter Pilot and Instructor, Architect, Covert Missions Operative, Retired, RV aficionado. 

 

Day 13, 8-02-18

Day 13, 8-02-18

August 5, 2018

Day 13, 8-02-18, Post-War War Stories

Cape Blanco —> Cummins Creek Wilderness —> Pixie House, Lincoln Beach, Oregon Coast

This podcast includes my second interview with Cat Williams, wherein Cat describes more about the covert operations in which he participated from 1972 - 1995, while working as a private citizen. I found it highly interesting, and it also confirmed for me that I was talking to a man who had not only been a helicopter pilot with a gunner who had killed many people, but also himself had killed many people in the years which would ensue. It was a striking contrast, sitting with this retired man in the front area of his RV, learning about what a lot of violence and related Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder he had experienced. We forged a good connection between us, and I was glad for the encounter. 

This episode also includes some narrative from my time creekside in the Cummins Creek Wilderness, along with a uke song I sang in remembrance of my friend Hans, who died on 11-11-11 just 3 miles down Highway 101 from where I was, at mile marker 175. 

By evening of Day 13, I had arrived at the Pixie House, a little north of Depoe Bay, a house that a kind soul (thanks Art!) has made available for my use at times when it is unoccupied. I will be at the Pixie House until Day 19, whereupon I leave for Beloved Music Festival in the Oregon Coastal Range. As I write this, it is Day 16, and I am using this time with a home and wireless internet to catch up on posting the podcast episodes (and lesson planning for my coming school year). After this, I have three more episodes to post to catch up to today, and I hope to be caught up in full by tomorrow, then stay that way until I depart for Beloved on Day 19. 

This episode is 72 minutes long and I think Cat’s hour is quite interesting. The first 12 minutes are my narrative and clips from Cummins Creek Wilderness, the remaining 60 are my second interview with Cat Williams.

The picture is my view from the "Pixie House" on Lincoln Beach the evening I arrived. I will stay here for seven days.  

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Cat Williams, Vietnam Combat Veteran, Warrant Officer, Helicopter Pilot, Architect, Covert Missions Operative, Retired, RV aficionado.

Day 14, 8-03-18

Day 14, 8-03-18

August 5, 2018

DAY 14, 8-3-18, Fishing Rock

Lincoln Beach, Oregon Coast

I met and interviewed another houseless ex-convict addict today, though this one was a more unsavory character than Robert Burnside, who I interviewed on Day 10 and to whom I felt a real heart connection. I found this man, Jeff Macklevoy , who is addicted to alcohol, to be a much less sympathetic figure. It turns out he was on Fishing Rock because he’d just been kicked out of his girlfriend’s trailer home community, where he’d been living in violation of the probationary rule that he was not supposed to live with her, because he had gone to prison for 14 months for domestically assaulting her. This was actually a misdemeanor which would not alone lead to imprisonment, but due to previous misdemeanors for DUIs, he was sent to prison. 

As you’ll hear if you listen, he seemed to be completely self-absorbed, have no remorse for his actions, or even recognize that he might have something to feel remorseful about. He sounds like he was intimidating, violent, and dangerous towards the woman he called his girlfriend. I hope for her sake that he’s not allowed back on the property, though from where he was sitting he was watching it in the distance. Listener discretion is advised, as some of what he says may be triggering and/or is offensive. I interviewed this man, only learning these details along the way, because he was the only man out on the picturesque Fishing Rock when I arrived. 

This episode is 44 minutes, 10 minutes of my opening narrative pertaining to the day, and 34 minutes interview with Jeff Macklevoy, domestic abuser and alcoholic, on day one of a multiple-day bender. He would sleep there that night, and (sneak preview of Day 15) I would run into him the next day as well. In any case, this was my first time on this podcasting journey where I interviewed someone I found to be in any way unsavory, but I still think the interview was interesting, and recommend it to people who can handle the offensiveness of his words and past behaviors. There’s a place for compassion and understanding even for him.

The photo is of Jeff Macklevoy on the rocky ledge of the south side of Fishing Rock, where I interviewed him, about 50 or 100 feet above the Pacific Ocean.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Jeff Macklevoy, Domestic Abuser, Alcoholic, Houseless, Ex-Convict

 

Day 15, 8-04-18

Day 15, 8-04-18

August 6, 2018

Day 15, 8-4-18, Shingle Weaving and Bus Driving

Lincoln Beach, Oregon Coast

Today was another peaceful day at the Pixie House on Lincoln Beach. As I have no human interaction at this location unless I actively seek it, that is what I did. I walked the beach and met recent retiree, Karen Nangle. She shared about her work as a shingle weaver, functional potter, single parent of four children, and bus driver for children with special needs. I found this, along with her gems of insight, very interesting. Perhaps you will too.

This episode is 42 minutes long. The first 10 minutes are my narrative in the run-up to meeting Karen, and the last 32 minutes are my interview with Karen. 

A small correction for this episode: For some reason I say at one point that it’s “Tuesday afternoon around 2 PM on Saturday, August 4.” Everything about that was true, except that it was not Tuesday. It was Saturday. Also, there is one place where I said “west of” and should have said “east of”.

The picture is a selfie I took on a cliff on the south side of Fishing Rock, about 50 or 100 feet above the Pacific Ocean.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Karen Nangle, Shingle Weaver, Functional Potter, School Bus Driver, Diabetic, Retiree

Day 16, 08-05-18

Day 16, 08-05-18

August 6, 2018

Day 16, 08-05-18, Full-time RVing and Work Camping

Lincoln Beach, Oregon Coast

Once again I walked Lincoln Beach looking for someone to interview. This time I found a beach-comber named Gary, who agreed to sit down and share with me a little bit about his retired life as a full-time RVer and work camper. While he did not want to share about the work he retired from, he did share about the full-time RVing and work camping he’s done since then, short but interesting.

This episode is 12 minutes long. The first 4 minutes are my narrative, and the last 8 minutes are my interview with Gary.

The picture is of the Pixie House on Lincoln Beach, where I am in the midst of a seven-day stay.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Gary, Retiree, Full-time RVer and Work Camper

Days 17, 8-06-18

Days 17, 8-06-18

August 6, 2018

Day 17, 8-06-18, The Not Uninteresting Family

Lincoln Beach, Oregon Coast

Today was another day of peaceful solitude along the Pacific Ocean. The only souls I interacted with were a pleasant family of four who I met along Lincoln Beach and recorded on Fishing Rock, in the same place I interviewed the man in the orange knit cap four days ago. 

Before the recording, the parents had told me they were not necessarily worth recording, because they were “not interesting”. I told them that so far I had not found anyone uninteresting thus far, and so if they actually were uninteresting that in itself would be interesting. The way Troy, Dad of the family put it, they were “remarkably unremarkable”. 

After 22 minutes of interviewing three members of the Davis Family, I had to inform them that they had failed at being uninteresting. Dad works with international accounts across the globe for a multi-national French fry making corporation that produces 8 billion pounds of potato products a year. Mom is a contract manager for a small hospital in the Tri-Cities area. Daughter is a student, and has played steel drums in bands for five years (since she was 10 years-old). I found my meeting with this friendly family to be pleasant, enriching, and decidedly interesting.

This episode is 31 minutes long. The first 7 minutes is my narrative, followed by 24 minutes with the Davis family. 

The photo is the Davis family and me on Fishing Rock. Missing from the picture is their 18-year-old son, who took the picture.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Troy Davis, International Accounts Manager for a multi-national French-fry corporation.

Shannon Davis, Contract Manager in a hospital

Megan Davis, 15-year-old student, steel drum musician

Day 18, 8-07-18

Day 18, 8-07-18

August 14, 2018

Day 18, 8-07-18, Laundry Fairy by the Sea

Lincoln Beach —> Lincoln City —> Siskiyou National Forest

Are you doing your laundry properly? Listen to this episode from Lincoln City, Oregon Coast, with Susan, “Laundry Fairy by the Sea”, and get some insider tips that you might not have known. Do you turn your socks right side out before washing? If not, you might consider it after hearing this episode. 

Posh Wash Laundromat is an establishment that offers self-service coin-operated machines, and full-service laundering. This evening I left the Pixie House on Lincoln Beach a day earlier than I had imagined, due to the anticipated arrival of a house cleaner early the next morning. As I had laundry to do for the next week of my travels, I ended up at Posh Wash, which is where I met Susan, who has worked there (and loves it!) for 20 years. 

After washing, cleaning, and packing my items, I hit the road around 6 PM. I drove about one hour southwest, into the coastal range and the Siskiyou National Forest, near to the Beloved Festival land where I would arrive the next day (Wednesday). As you will hear if you listen, I arrived at a rather remote spot down an overgrown narrow road in the Siskiyou, and camped in a lovely fern-filled meadow. It was another inspiring day, and a pleasure to meet someone who enjoyed her work as much as Susan. 

This episode is 18 minutes long. The first 8 minutes are my narratives from the Siskiyou National Forest, and the last 10 minutes are my interview with Susan. 

The picture is of the fern meadow where I camped this night in the Siskiyou National Forest.

 

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Susan, Laundry Fairy

Day 19, 8-08-18

Day 19, 8-08-18

August 14, 2018

Day 19, 8-08-18, Chef on a River

Siskiyou National Forest —> Alsea River —> Beloved Fest Land, Tidewater, OR

I spent the first few hours of the day creekside in the Siskiyou National Forest, by which I had camped the night before. Prior to leaving in early afternoon, I nearly filled a paper shopping bag full with ripe blackberries that were growing alongside the abandoned road, and many more did I leave behind. It seemed peak season. 

After blackberry picking, I departed from the overgrown narrow road, traveled back 15 miles to the (mostly) quiet Highway 34, and nearer to the Beloved Festival Land, near which I enjoyed a couple of hours on a rock in the middle of the Alsea River.

There I met an interesting man named Jobie Bailey, an accomplished Portland chef and restauranteur, who currently works sales with restaurants as a gourmet food purveyor, and was out with his dog taking a break from a wedding gathering on the coast, where his dog drinks too much salt water.  

After this time with Jobie and alone on the river, while baby fish nibbled my feet throughout, I arrived at the Beloved Fest land, set up camp, and enjoyed the evening and night there. The festival would have its soft opening the following night, Thursday. 

This episode is 18 minutes long. It starts with 7 minutes of my narrative, 3 minutes of a riverside song, and 8 minutes with Jobie Bailey.

The picture is a selfie I took this day in the middle of the Alsea River. 

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Jobie Bailey, Chef, Restauranteur, Gourmet Food Purveyor

Day 20, 8-09-18

Day 20, 8-09-18

August 15, 2018

Day 20, 8-09-18, Blossoming with Bloom

Beloved Festival, Tidewater, OR

The Beloved Festival had its soft opening this evening, which included a session of ecstatic dance at the Yoga Pavilion, and a kirtan music performance by Jaya Lakshmi and Ananda in the Purple Star Temple. I was busy working on this day, helping to set up the booth for Coconut Bliss, a coconut-based ice cream company for whom I would be working for the weekend. Before I knew it, after working, dancing and dining, night had arrived and I had not collected a single recording. At about 10 PM, I ran into Bloom, who I had met briefly at the Plants Enchant gathering a couple of weeks earlier, and he was kind enough to sit down with me and share his story. 

Bloom is a 28-year-old nomadic permaculturist singer and songwriter, and a very nice person. He shared about how his life came to be what it is now, and he also beautifully sang and played one of the songs he has written. I am so happy for the chance to have met this interesting person. 

This episode is 33 minutes long. The first 6 minutes are my narrative, and the remaining 27 minutes are Bloom’s story and song.

I did not take any pictures this day. The photo is a selfie from Cape Blanco on the morning of Day 13.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator 

Robin “Bloom” Liepman, Permaculturist, Musician, Songwriter

Song, “The Global Village Tapestry”

 

Day 21, 8-10-18

Day 21, 8-10-18

August 16, 2018

Day 21, 8-10-18, Man of the World, Child of the Present

Beloved Festival

Toby “Two Toes” Gamboroni is such a diversely interesting person that I don’t know how to write this little piece introducing him. If you listen to him you’ll learn from this one-time blacklight-juggling, fire-breathing, circus starter about urine therapy, semen retention, dolphin childbirth, Margaret Thatcher’s crackdown on rave culture—and that’s just what I’m remembering in the moment.

Shortly after meeting with Toby, I met a woman named Amethyst, who was at the festival with her six-year-old son, Tristan. Tristan saw my microphone and wanted to be interviewed. This was a fun time for me, and my first interview with a young child.

The festival officially kicked off today, and while I will refrain from going into all the good things about it, I will comment that it is both one of my favorite festivals, and probably one of the best world-music festivals in the world. Thank you Beloved!

This episode is 77 minutes long. The first 5 minutes are my narrative, then 67 minutes with Toby Gamboroni, and the final 5 minutes are my interview with young Tristan.

I have no photo from this day. The picture is of a sunset from the Pixie House on Lincoln Beach on Day 13 of the journey.

Voices: 

Matt Burns, Narrator

Toby Gamboroni, Sustainable Designer and Builder, Holographic Harmonizer, Former Circus Performer and Ascetic

Amethyst and Tristan, Mother and Child

Day 22, 8-12-18

Day 22, 8-12-18

August 17, 2018

Day 22, 8-11-18, A Good-Hearted Man

Beloved Festival

Today’s episode is just one interview, with a person who is dear to my heart and the hearts of many, Chris Garrison. Chris is one of the kindest, most loving men I know. We became friends while living together at Lost Valley Educational Center, a permaculture community outside of Eugene, Oregon. (I lived there from 2006-07, and he some years longer.) It was quite interesting to hear more of Chris’ story, and where his life is at now due to the struggling small-business cannabis industry. I think others will also benefit from hearing what Chris had to share in my tent that drizzly second morning of the Beloved Festival. Thanks for visiting!

This episode is 30 minutes long.  The first 3 minutes are my narrative, and the remaining 27 are my interview with Chris Garrison.

I took no photos this day. The picture is of a sunset from Fishing Rock on the Oregon Coast on Day 14 of the journey.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Chris Garrison, Community Builder, Chef, Dancer, Productions and Sales Manager, Cannabis Farmer, Pursuer of Authenticity

Day 23, 8-12-18

Day 23, 8-12-18

August 17, 2018

Day 23, 8-12-18, A Lost Interview, A Gained Interview

Beloved Festival

On this journey, in addition to some minor technical difficulties within recordings, I also permanently lost several interviews or pieces of interviews. These were pretty much entirely user error. These included my first interview with Grant Putnam on Day 3, as well as pieces of four interviews and one full interview from Breitenbush Hot Springs. Once I figured out what was going wrong, I was able to prevent this from happening for the rest of the journey. But I lost another today. 

None of the other lost interviews was quite as lamentable as the one I lost on this day, due in part to the reason I lost it, but also because the person’s story was so fascinating. I’ll blame it on fatigue, but as you’ll hear in more detail if you listen to the opening of this episode, I lost the one-hour interview due to the fact that I had never recorded it, due to the fact that I was sitting on the other end of my microphone cable, instead of having it plugged into the recorder. Having lost the use of my headphones several days earlier due to the jack falling into the machine, and not being able to see the light showing the levels due to the daylight, I did not notice that while I was recording, I was not recording any sound through the unplugged microphone. Despite that loss, the encounter remains a special one. It’s better to have heard his story and lost it, than to not have heard it at all. And who is he?

The lost interview was with Larry Kaplowitz, who along with his wife, Luna, founded Coconut Bliss, the organic coconut-based ice cream company that was employing me for the festival (and which they no longer own). It was a fascinating story, and only peripherally had to do with Coconut Bliss. We also talked a lot about Larry’s history growing up and coming of age as an artist in and around New York City, and his long-time enthusiastic carrying of “Solsara” work, which the website I just looked up (www.solsara.net), describes as “a cultural movement dedicated to exploring what it means to be human together.” Coconut Bliss, when Luna and Larry were still the owners, provided the original seed money that made the first Beloved Festival possible 10 years ago, and Larry has traditionally offered 90-minute Solsara workshops with a colleague on each day of Beloved. This interview took place right after I had participated in the final one of the weekend. Perhaps Larry and I can give it another go next summer.

Right after Larry walked away, I noticed my recording mishap. By this time it was 2 PM, and I knew I needed a nap before my 5 - 11 PM shift that night. When I woke from my nap at 4 PM, my new friend, Jay, one of the managers of the Coconut Bliss booth with whom I am working, was serendipitously outside my tent. He also needed to work at 5 PM, but was helpfully willing (as is his general way) to come into my tent and be spontaneously interviewed. It was interesting to learn more about who he is, and I think you might feel the same. The loss of Larry’s interview led to the gain of hearing Jay’s story, which would not have happened otherwise. 

This episode is 20 minutes long. The first 11 minutes are my narrative, and the remaining 9 minutes are my interview with Jay. 

I do not have a picture for this day. The photo is from Cummins Creek in the Cummins Creek Wilderness, off the Oregon Coast, where I visited on Day 13.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Jay Jzo, Events and Sales Assistant at Coconut Bliss

Day 24, 8-13-18

Day 24, 8-13-18

August 18, 2018

Day 24, 8-13-08, Super-Connector and Pleiadian Channel

Beloved Festival Land —> Portland, OR

Welcome to the final episode of this little podcasting adventure, Unlikely Stories, Day 24 of 24! Today was the pack-up, break-down and departure day at Beloved Festival land. Before departing for Portland (and back to the the home from which I had been gone for two months) in the late afternoon, I was able to catch up with two people (of five) with whom I had been trying to connect all weekend to interview. One of these, Albert, is a friend from Portland, with whom I shared a campsite at the last Beloved Festival. I first (and regularly) met Albert at a mutual friend’s house a few years ago. This friend would have monthly gatherings in her backyard each full moon time. It was a potluck, and there would be a camp fire, and a wood-fired sauna. Often people played music and sang around the camp fire. 

Albert stood out to me, not only because he was a kind, funny, and gregarious person, but he is also one of those people who can hold together a circle of song singers and musicians, because of his social aptitude, his excellent guitar and singing talent, and his ability to remember the lyrics to an extraordinary number of songs. But Albert is much more than that, as you will hear if you listen to this episode. He is a loving man, a community builder, a super connector, a co-counselor, an activist, a social media marketing teacher, and what he calls “an artist who paints with people.” 

After speaking with Albert, I was able to catch up with Dante. He is someone I met briefly at the Plants Enchant gathering, and had found quite interesting. He lives nomadically, traveling the world as a ceremonial space holder and a channel of celestial guides, particularly the Pleiadian star beings. It was fascinating to hear from him.

This episode is 53 minutes long. The first 6 minutes are my narrative, the next 37 minutes are with Albert, and then 10 minutes with Dante.

The picture is of Dante.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Albert Kaufman, Social Media Marketing Teacher, Super Connector, Re-evaluation Counselor, Party Guitarist.

Dante Singh, Channel, Ceremonial Space Holder, Medicine Carrier

Addendum Day, 8-18-18

Addendum Day, 8-18-18

August 20, 2018

Addendum Day, 8-18-18, Shoe Repair and Furniture Reclamation

Portland, Oregon

On the first day of this little podcasting adventure, I met two shop owners who were interested in participating in the project, but could only do so if I returned to them after the journey had ended. I returned as planned, and with these two interviews—taken while their shops were open, and thus sometimes interrupted by the arrival of customers—I bring this summer’s podcasting project to a close, with the hopes of returning for another such adventure next summer. 

The first interview is with Joshua Thrower, who owns and operates George’s Shoe Repair, which was started in Portland by his father around a half-century ago. It was his father who I had visited the shop intending to interview, not knowing that his father had retired a few years back. It was interesting to hear from Joshua, who used to be a professional modern dancer in New York City, about how he came to take on his father’s trade and now carries forward the business on his own. 

Due to the next-door proximity of her shop, I met Lisa Callandrillo, owner of The Reclaimory, on my first visit to George’s Shoe Repair, while I was waiting to talk to Joshua, who had a line of customers. We got to talking about her trade, and she kindly agreed to share her story for this podcast. Lisa’s description of her work, which involves furniture restoration and handcrafted item curation, ended at the six o’clock hour that her shop was to close, and it also marks the close of this little podcasting adventure. 

Now, as someone whose own story has been transformed by the many stories of others now woven within me, I close this little podcasting adventure—until next summer! Thanks for listening!

This episode is 50 minutes long. The first 5 minutes are my narrative, followed by 20 minutes with Joshua Thrower, and 25 minutes with Lisa Callandrillo.

The picture is of Joshua Thrower in his shop on Hawthorne Boulevard.

Voices:

Matt Burns, Narrator

Joshua Thrower, Shoe Repairman, Owner of George’s Shoe Repair

Lisa Callandrillo, Furniture Upholsterer and Restorer, Owner of The Reclaimory

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 1 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 1 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 1 of 12:

Jennie Clifford - Biodynamic Farmer, Carlton Farms

www.carltonfarms.net

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 2 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 2 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 2 of 12:

Ueli Hurter - Co-Head of the Agriculture Section at the Goetheanum and Executive Board Member of the International Biodynamic Association

(Ueli’s Bio and Picture are from the Biodynamic Association website, www.biodynamics.com)

Ueli Hurter has been the co-head of the Agriculture Section at the Goetheanum (with Jean-Michel Florin) since 2010 and currently sits on the executive board International Biodynamic Association. A native of Switzerland, he completed agricultural apprenticeships in Switzerland, Germany, and France. He has been involved with the Agriculture Section since 1994 and has formerly served as President of the Swiss Demeter association and as Swiss spokesman to Demeter International. Alongside his work as leader of the Section for Agriculture, he is co-manager of the enterprise Ferme de L'Aubier, a Demeter certified farm with mixed culture and an on-farm cheese dairy, bio-hotel, bio-restaurant, café-hotel, and eco-living quarters. L'Aubier is an associatively organized corporation with direct financing. Additionally, he is the co-founder of the initiative "Sowing the future“ (http://www.avenirsem.ch). Ueli Hurter lives near Neuchâtel in Switzerland and is married to Katrin Hofmann Hurter, with three children.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 3 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 3 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 3 of 12:

Thea Maria Carlson - Executive Director of Biodynamic Association in America

(Thea’s Picture is from the Biodynamic Association website, www.biodynamics.com)

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 4 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 4 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 4 of 12: 

Matias Baker - Consultant, Biodynamic Preparation Maker, and Alchemical Journeyman

(Matias’ Bio and Picture are from the Blossoms Biodynamic Farm website, www.blossomsfarm.com)

Matias works with local and national farms and wineries to develop their biodynamic preparation protocols. He also consults for Finca Luna Nueva in Costa Rica, developing Biodynamic preparations specific to the tropics.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 5 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 5 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 5 of 12: 

Eurythmy Spring Valley Touring Ensemble - www.eurythmy.org 

(Description below taken from the Eurythmy Spring Valley’s email announcement of this interview. Photograph taken by my phone after interview.)

“The Eurythmy Spring Valley Ensemble has recently returned from their annual Fall tour, which took them to the colorful hills of Massachusetts and then out west to the creative and forward-thinking city of Portland, Oregon. The Ensemble brought their four different programs to several area Waldorf Schools and to the 2018 Biodynamic Conference, Transforming the Heart of Agriculture, which took place in Portland from November 14 -18.

During the Biodynamic Conference, podcaster Matthew Burns interviewed five current members and one former member of the Eurythmy Spring Valley Ensemble, to share their thoughts about the unique art form of eurythmy. Come hear what inspires them about their practice as eurythmists, working with the lawfulness of sound and speech, bringing to visibility the fullness of human experience, and the transformational process of becoming an instrument that truly speaks and sings. They also reveal insights into their four-year training and their emerging new evening program. Ensemble Members include (from left to right in the photo): Oana Havris (ESVE 2009 - 2013), Sea-Anna Vasilas, Zachary Dolphin, Ivilisse Esguerra Venho, Virginia Hermann and Elsa Macauley.”

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 6 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 6 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 6 of 12: 

Sundeep Kamath - Board Secretary of the Biodynamic Association of India, Board Member of IFOAM Asia, and Organizing Committee Member of the 19th Organic World Congress

(Sundeep’s bio is from the Biodynamic Association website, www.biodynamics.com. Photo taken by my phone after interview.)

"Sundeep Kamath was part of the team that started the first school, in Asia, of biodynamic farming offering a two-year residential diploma program for underprivileged rural high school graduates. Prior to this, he was a founding parent of the first Waldorf School in Bangalore. In 2013 he joined the board of the Biodynamic Association of India (BDAI) and since 2016 has served as its Secretary. The BDAI is currently reinventing itself over a three-year period (through 2019) with the help of the Andreas Hermes Akademie (AHA), the training arm of the Deutscher Bauernverband (German Farmers Association), as part of the German Federal Ministry of Economic Cooperation and Development’s special initiative "One world – no hunger" global program. He was elected to the IFOAM Asia board in May 2017 in Xichong County, China. He is also part of the Organic Food Systems Program, a core initiative of United Nations 10YFP Sustainable Food Systems Program and was on the organizing committee of the 19th Organic World Congress held in Delhi in November 2017."

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 7 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 7 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 7 of 12:

Carin Fortin and Delmar McComb - Founders of Blossom’s Biodynamic Farm

(Carin and Delmar’s bios taken from Blossoms Farm website, www.blossomsfarm.com. Photo taken with my phone after interview.)

Carin Fortin – Herb farmer, herbalist and teacher, active as BDANC (Biodynamic Association of Northern California) member, served as BDANC newsletter editor and core group member for many years, is a student of Biodynamics and Anthroposophy, and a member of the Circle of representatives, the planning committee of the international Biodynamic conference in Dornach, Switzerland. With a wide variety of herbs from different traditions (Western, TCM and Ayurveda +), Blossom’s Biodynamic Herb Farm produces bitters, tinctures, hydrosols, skincare products and tonics – some inspired by Carin’s family’s tradition, in particular her grandmother, who founded a hydro colonics wellness spa in 1928 in the Swiss pre-alps. Carin co-founded and currently runs Blossom’s Farm in Corralitos CA, where she lives with her partner Delmar McComb.

Delmar McComb - Director of Horticulture for Suncrest Nurseries Inc. in Watsonville, California, where he has introduced environmentally friendly growing practices into this prominent and extremely diverse California wholesale nursery. He was also able to develop a Demeter Certified line of Biodynamically grown plants at Suncrest which is now available throughout California. Delmar also co-owns Blossom’s Biodynamic Farm with his partner Carin Fortin where they grow and process approximately 100 varieties of medicinal herbs which in turn are made into health and beauty care products. A long-time operatic tenor, he sings leading roles with opera companies around the state when he can spare the time.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 8 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 8 of 12

December 1, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 8 of 12:

Lisa Romero - Complementary Health Practitioner, Adult Educator, and Author of Inner Development Books

(Lisa’s bio and photo are from the Biodynamic Association website, www.biodynamics.com.)

Lisa's websites:

Inner Work Path - www.innerworkpath.com

Developing the Self - www.developingtheself.org

Lisa Romero is an author of inner development books, a complementary health practitioner, and an adult educator who has been offering healthcare and education enriched with anthroposophy since 1993. Since 2006, the primary focus of her work has been on teaching inner development and anthroposophical meditation. Through the Inner Work Path, Lisa offers lectures, courses, and retreats for personal and professional development in communities and schools worldwide. SteinerBooks has published The Inner Work Path, focusing on meditation practice; Developing the Self, written after years of working with Waldorf teachers to support their inner work and pedagogical understanding of child development; Living Inner Development, offering an understanding of the inner experiences and results of various inner development exercises; Sex Education and the Spirit, to help awaken an understanding of our communal responsibility for the healthy development of gender and sexuality within society; and Spirit Led Community — Healing the Impacts of Technology, helping individuals work to find a free inner relationship to the forces of rampant materialism and technology, towards building new forms of healthy community.

Lisa is a contributor, tutor, and director of Inner Work Path, EduCareDo, Developing the Self Developing the World, and the Y Project. EduCareDo is an organization delivering a distance education course of self-awakening study in the foundations of anthroposophy. Developing the Self Developing the World delivers community education, and the Y Project supports the bridging of young people into healthy community life.

 

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 9 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 9 of 12

December 2, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 9 of 12:

Megan Durney - Head Gardener, Pfeiffer Center, Chestnut Ridge, NY

(Megan’s bio is from the Pfeiffer Center website, www.pfeiifercenter.org. Photo taken by my phone after the interview.)

Megan Durney joined the Pfeiffer Center as an intern in 2006. She takes a leading role in planning and carrying out each season’s production, and manages the Pfeiffer Center’s CSA and farm stand operations. She has conducted workshops on beekeeping, permaculture, canning and preserving, and biodynamic preparation-making, and she directs the Pfeiffer Center’s Neighbor to Neighbor youth gardening program.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 10 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 10 of 12

December 2, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 10 of 12:

Jeff Poppen - Farmer at Long Hungry Creek Farm, Garden Columnist, and Author of The Best of the Barefoot Farmer

(Jeff’s bio is from the Biodynamic Association website, www.biodynamics.com. Photo taken by my phone after interview.)

Jeff Poppen, also known as the Barefoot Farmer, is the owner and operator of one of the oldest and largest organic farms in Tennessee. For the past 15 years Poppen has appeared on Nashville PBS’ television program "Volunteer Gardener", for over 20 years he has written a gardening column for the Macon County Chronicle, and he is the author of two books, The Best of the Barefoot Farmer Vol. 1 & Vol. 2. Poppen runs a community supported agriculture (CSA) program with the food he grows, using about 8 acres of his farmland and with about 40 head of cattle. This CSA delivers fresh produce to about 150 patrons in the Nashville area, but does not account for all of the food grown at the Barefoot Farmer’s farm. Poppen is always sure to have extra for neighbors, friends, and the surrounding community. While he has only been making and utilizing biodynamic preparations in his farming and gardening for a little over 25 years, he is very proud to have spent the last 40 years providing his own food for himself from what he is able to grow.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 11 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 11 of 12

December 2, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 11 of 12:

Theo Maehr - Teacher, Artist and Author

(Theo’s bio and photo taken from Lucky Valley Press website, www.luckyvalleypress.com.)

Theo is a teacher and artist who has lived on the Monterey Peninsula on the Central California Coast for more than twenty years. In addition to being an author, he is a lyre maker, a ship captain, photographer, house builder, farmer and diver.

His prior endeavors have included Waldorf teaching, professional storytelling, outdoor education, agriculture, construction, raft guiding, and lots and lots of time wandering around in nature.

Theo currently lives in the Santa Lucia mountains of Big Sur, where he has built himself a delightfully sturdy and simple "off-the-grid" home with an ample garden and orchard.

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 12 of 12

Voices from the Biodynamic Conference, Interview 12 of 12

December 2, 2018

2018 Biodynamic Conference -

“Transforming the Heart of Agriculture: Soil. Justice. Regeneration.”

Portland, Oregon

November, 2018

 

Interview 12 of 12:

Jairo Gonzalez - Co-worker and Lead Farmer at Rudolf Steiner Fellowship Community, Chestnut Ridge, NY

(Jairo’s photo taken from Pfeiffer Center website, www.pfeiffercenter.org.)